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Rocks Can Prove Deceptive for Hikers | News

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Rocks Can Prove Deceptive for Hikers
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Experienced hikers Jasmine Sanders and Braulio Jimenez like to get out and enjoy the natural beauty of Red Rock.

LAS VEGAS -- Andrew Sasse's death was the first of the year at Red Rock National Conservation Area. Numerous times a year, Metro's Search and Rescue unit is called to assist a climber who has fallen or become trapped.

Police are asking people to make sure they are prepared to hike when they visit areas like Red Rock. Officers say the mountains and canyons can be deceptive and often people do not wear the proper gear.

Experienced hikers Jasmine Sanders and Braulio Jimenez like to get out and enjoy the natural beauty of Red Rock.

"It's amazing, beautiful. I love it,"Jimenez said.

Some of the hikes can be challenging for seasoned hikers and downright dangerous for beginners.

Edwin Sanders was scaling some rocks for the first time. Even though he is an avid basketball player and used to working out, he found the climbing challenging.

"It's a lot harder and scarier going down than you would imagine," he said. 

Metro officer Bill Cassell served on Metro's Search and Rescue team for 10 years and took part in countless rescues.

"Go prepared. Go with the right equipment. Go with the right training. Go with the right knowledge," Cassell said.

He says hikers often don't understand that going up is easier than coming down.

"You get up there, you can't come back down that way, and many times it results in a fall," Cassell said. "A 10 or 15 foot fall on solid rock is a devastating event." 

Metro Police are forced to send up their search and rescue helicopter to rescue hikers who are trapped, or seriously hurt. Police urge hikers, who get into trouble, to stay calm and call for help.

Police recommend hikers have water, a hat and shoes with a proper grip to deal with the rocks before setting out on a hike. 

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