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Clark County Fire preparing Mt. Charleston residents for fire season

Clark County Fire preparing Mt. Charleston residents for fire season

Recent fires near San Diego and last year's Carpenter 1 Fire on Mt. Charleston are a reminder of just how dangerous wildfire season is in the western United States.

The Clark County Fire Department is hosting some events over the next few weeks to remind people about the dangers of wildfires and how to protect themselves and their property.

The Living with Fire community preparedness event will be from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Tuesday at the Resort at Mount Charleston, 2275 Kyle Canyon Road.

Representatives from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, Nevada Division of Forestry and other state agencies as well as Clark County Fire will be there to talk to community members about being prepared for fire season.

Next month, the fire department will host the annual Mt. Charleston Pine Needle Pickup and Barbecue.

Scientists Concerned about Mountain Butterflies Following Wildfire

Scientists Concerned about Mountain Butterflies Following Wildfire

Concern is growing about the future of several butterfly species on Mt. Charleston, following the Carpenter 1 fire that swept through thousands of acres in July.

One species in question is the Mountain Charleston blue butterfly, which is found only on the mountain. It is one of three species that are now considered endangered.

Life science experts from UNLV are teaming up with the U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to figure out how to sustain those species.

During a panel Wednesday, one expert explained the danger of an event like a wildfire on a species with such a small population, like the butterfly.

"Any catastrophic event that might happen in one part of the habitat might decimate the species. Whereas, that same effect would not be pronounced for a more widespread species," Daniel Thompson, UNLV Life Sciences Professor, said.

Helimulching Operations to Begin in Kyle Canyon

Helimulching Operations to Begin in Kyle Canyon

MT. CHARLESTON, Nev. -- Efforts will begin on Sunday to help stabilize the hillsides in Kyle Canyon recently burned by the Carpenter 1 Fire.

Straw will be transported by a helicopter and applied over the burned areas to protect soils from erosion and provide ground cover.

The helimulching will be done on nearly 400 acres on the north facing slopes in upper Kyle Canyon. It's expected the process will take one week with the helicopter operations occurring between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. daily.

Bristlecone, Bonanza, Trail Canyon, Robbers Roost, Mummy Springs, Telephone Canyon, Fletcher Canyon, Sawmill Loop, and Mary Jane Falls are open. North Loop is open to Charleston Peak only.

Due to the hazards left by the Carpenter 1 Fire, Griffith Peak, South Loop, Cathedral Rock, Echo/Little Falls and the Lovell Canyon Trail System remain closed.

Pack In, Pack Out Program Launched at Floyd Lamb Park

Pack In, Pack Out Program Launched at Floyd Lamb Park

The city of Las Vegas wants people to help keep city parks clean and recycle, so it is launching a pilot program at Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs.

When people arrive at the park, they will be given a small blue bag for recycling and a small clear bag for trash. When people leave the park, they will be asked to drop off two bags at a designated area.

Park officials hope the Pack In, Pack Out program will get people to think about reducing how much trash they put into a trash bin and how much they can recycle.

The city's recycling program at parks has been able to hit a 50 percent recycling rate or higher.

Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs was chosen as a pilot project because visitors must enter and exit through one access point. 

Students Plant Tree at Northwest Park

Students Plant Tree at Northwest Park

 

The City of Las Vegas and a third-grade class from Kay Carl Elementary School worked together to plant a tree at a northwest park in honor of Arbor Day.

The students and city officials gathered Monday to plant a tree at Polly Gonzalez Memorial Park, 5425 Corbett Street, at the corner of West El Campo Grande and North Bradley Road.

Besides the Raywood ash tree that was planted, the kids placed a time capsule in the spot that includes short essays from the students about what is happening environmentally in Las Vegas and around the world.

"We had a time capsule where we did research on environmental issues in Las Vegas and Nevada and we planted them so that when we open up the time capsule in 50 or 100 years, they will know exactly the environmental issues of the day," Sue Rodrigues from Carl Elementary School said.

The city has had a program in place since 1950 to plant trees at parks around southern Nevada.

Tree Planting to Mark Arbor Day for Students

Tree Planting to Mark Arbor Day for Students

City of Las Vegas officials will join a third-grade class from Kay Carl Elementary School and their principal Dr. Robert Bennett to plant a Raywood ash tree.

The ceremony will starti at 9:30 a.m. Monday, May 20 in Polly Gonzalez Memorial Park in honor of Arbor Day. The park is located next to the school at 5425 Corbett St., at the corner of West El Campo Grande and North Bradley Road.

Laura Eisenberg, a community forester with the Nevada Division of Forestry, will present the city with a Tree City USA flag. This is the 21st year Las Vegas has earned this recognition from the National Arbor Day Foundation because of the city’s program to care for trees.

Volunteers Needed to Clean-up Around Lone Mountain

Volunteers Needed to Clean-up Around Lone Mountain

 

Volunteers are needed to help clean-up a desert area at the base of Lone Mountain.

The Bureau of Land Management, Get Outdoors Nevada and Clark County Commissioner Larry Brown are sponsoring the event Saturday.

They're looking for people to help clean up illegally dumped trash and litter in the area between Lone Mountain Park and the base of Lone Mountain.

Registration starts at 8:30 a.m. on the eastern edge of Lone Mountain. The cleanup effort runs from 9 a.m. to noon. Volunteers should wear sturdy shoes, a hat and sunscreen. The BLM will provide snacks, water, trash bags, gloves and hand tools.

The BLM sponsored 10 similar cleanups each year. Last year, volunteers removed 270 yards of trash from public lands.