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CCSD teachers finding creative ways to pay for supplies ahead first day |

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CCSD teachers finding creative ways to pay for supplies ahead first day

LAS VEGAS (KLAS) — CCSD teachers returned to work this month without a bump in salary. Educators spent the last week setting up classrooms without that 3 percent raise they hoped to receive.

8 news now reporter Cristen Drummond spoke to a teacher as she prepared to welcome students back on Monday.

More on her effort tonight and an update on @ClarkCountySch teachers working without the 3 percent salary bump at the moment. @cceanv says negotiations are ongoing. Find out when the union and district will meet again tonight at 5 @8NewsNow #8NN pic.twitter.com/lejvV7x0ax

— Cristen Drummond (@CristenDrummond) August 10, 2019

Negotiations continue between the Clark County Education Association and the school district. The teachers union plans to meet with the district again this week to resolve the pay issue immediately or the strike may happen.

Meanwhile, teachers stay focused on the upcoming year.

“A lot of us are working in our classrooms, getting things set up so we’re ready to go for Monday,” Roundy Elementary School teacher Tracy Fournier.

From setting up desks to organizing books, it takes hours to get ready to welcome students to their classrooms.

Fournier’s school provides pencils, papers, and scissors for students but it’s often not enough.

“There’s always more that we need to have a good year,” she says. “We go through so many pencils, it’s not even funny like you’d even think how many pencils an elementary school classroom goes through in a year.”

Fournier estimates she spends more than 200 dollars of out of pocket on supplies a year.

“A lot of us spend our money on curriculum sometimes to supplement what we already use,” said Fournier.

Thankfully, a new social media campaign called #clearthelists is helping her and other teachers nationwide stock their classrooms.

Educators create a wishlist on Amazon and use the hashtag when posting online, then strangers or friends can buy items. Fournier’s list mostly consists of books.

“There’s never enough books for us to read,” she says.

Fournier estimates she’ll teach between 26 and 30 students and programs like these are helping them make sure that each kid has the tools they need to succeed.

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