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Attorneys Argue for New Trial for O.J. Simpson | Crime

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Attorneys Argue for New Trial for O.J. Simpson
Crime

LAS VEGAS -- O.J. Simpson is serving year two of a 33-year Nevada prison sentence for robbery and kidnapping. Friday, his legal team asked Nevada's Supreme Court for a new trial.

Simpson was found guilty with co-defendant Clarence Stewart for stealing sports memorabilia at gunpoint at Palace Station. The attorneys for the two men say the trial judge had it out for them from the beginning.

Simpson's attorney told three Supreme Court justices that Judge Jackie Glass unfairly embarrassed them in the eyes of the jury.

"There was this pervasive feeling that was created that Brent and myself and the rest of the defense lawyers were basically children and that David and Chris were God," said Simpson's attorney Yale Galanter.

"Was her conduct so prejudicial that the jury felt that she was taking one side or the other? Really, that's the inquiry? My perspective, the answer is no," said District Attorney David Roger.

Simpson's attorney added that jurors were never allowed in their instructions to consider that Simpson never intended to cause harm. That argument was taken on by the DA.

"If we are to accept what he says, then under Nevada law, you can take some gunmen and a bunch of big thugs, lure people into a hotel room with guns and take property," said Roger.

Co-defendant Clarence Stewart's attorney calls out prosecutors and the judge for removing the only two African American jurors from the panel.

"The only real difference that can be articulated between that juror and other jurors that did make it and sat on the jury is the color of their skin. It's problematic when you have black clients," said attorney Brent Bryson.

But Roger says the potential juror's own statements called into question their impartiality.

"When asked in the jury questionnaire whether she has a religious objection to serving, she wrote, 'Judge not lest ye be judged,'" he said.

As Simpson awaits the court's decision at Lovelock State Prison, his attorney recalls the last time he talked to his client.

"He's doing ok. He's very hopeful that the appeal is successful," said Galanter.

The panel of judges can take as long as they like to make their decision. Past history indicates a decision is likely next week. If they agree with Simpson's legal team, it could mean an entirely new trial.

Crime